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Socially, ethically and environmentally

conscious storytelling.

 

OUR WORK

1/1
 

HELPING GOOD PEOPLE

TELL GOOD STORIES

At ScreenStories we empower brands and businesses to tell the world about their socially, environmentally and ethically conscious activities and ambitions.

 

We want to help the planet, and its people. Through communication, we can shine a light on efforts of others who share that goal.

Businesses, brands, NGOs, charities, let's make the world a better place!

 

CHANNEL

6 STEPS TO WRITING A SCREENPLAY | 1. IDEA
07:17

6 STEPS TO WRITING A SCREENPLAY | 1. IDEA

This is the start of your journey towards telling your story. Your idea is the spark that ignites your interest in whatever you want to write about, but there’s so much more you can do to set yourself up for success. In this episode we start to look at our connection to stories and storytelling. We talk about developing your premise, defining your controlling idea, and honing in on your intention with a logline. — In this episode we use examples from: Cast Away - https://www.imdb.com/title/tt0162222/?ref_=fn_al_tt_1 The Edge of Tomorrow - https://www.imdb.com/title/tt1631867/?ref_=nv_sr_srsg_0 Jurassic Park - https://www.imdb.com/title/tt0107290/?ref_=nv_sr_srsg_0 Finding Nemo - https://www.imdb.com/title/tt0266543/?ref_=nv_sr_srsg_0 Scarface - https://www.imdb.com/title/tt0086250/?ref_=fn_al_tt_1 Erin Brockovich - https://www.imdb.com/title/tt0195685/?ref_=nv_sr_srsg_0 — 6 STEPS TO WRITING A SCREENPLAY is a quick-start guide to transforming your initial ideas into a fully developed story. Across the series we look at IDEAS, PLOT, RHYTHM, CHARACTER, DIALOGUE and SCENE WORKSHOP. The ideas presented in this series are of course not my own, but rather my own collection of lessons that particularly resonated with me, which I’ve tried to organise in a way that feels practical. However I should give special mention to the following inspirational teachers and sources which have contributed tremendous amounts of material to what’s included in this series. Robert McKee - https://mckeestory.com Blake Snyder - https://savethecat.com John August - https://johnaugust.com Craig Mazin - https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Craig_Mazin Syd Field - https://sydfield.com John Yorke - https://www.johnyorkestory.com Bang2Write - https://bang2write.com — ScreenStories is a place for storytellers to learn, to teach, to help each other out, and to be inspired. All discussion on screenwriting, storytelling, narrative, books, films, TV shows…or anything else that interests you is welcome. Most of the content here is in the form of writing tutorials, but art-is-more-art-than-science, and rules are meant to be broken, so please tell me if you disagree with anything in the videos, or would like to offer alternative perspectives on any of the topics. Thank you for being here! — Let’s keep the conversation going! Facebook - @ScreenStoriesChannel Instagram - @ScreenStoriesChannel Twitter - @_ScreenStories Web - screenstories.co LinkedIn - ScreenStories YouTube - ScreenStories
6 STEPS TO WRITING A SCREENPLAY | 2. PLOT
18:02

6 STEPS TO WRITING A SCREENPLAY | 2. PLOT

An understanding of plot can be the most powerful weapon you have against the dreaded blank page. Guide your protagonists journey, maximise emotion and payoff, and keep your pacing in check. In this episode we’ll break down the component parts of plot, and explore what keeps your audience engaged in your story. — In this film we use examples from: Hancock - https://www.imdb.com/title/tt0448157/?ref_=nv_sr_srsg_0 Thor - https://www.imdb.com/title/tt0800369/?ref_=nv_sr_srsg_6 Moana - https://www.imdb.com/title/tt3521164/?ref_=fn_al_tt_1 The Lego Batman Movie - https://www.imdb.com/title/tt4116284/?ref_=fn_al_tt_1 Megamind - https://www.imdb.com/title/tt1001526/?ref_=nv_sr_srsg_0 — 6 STEPS TO WRITING A SCREENPLAY is a quick-start guide to transforming your initial ideas into a fully developed story. Across the series we look at IDEAS, PLOT, RHYTHM, CHARACTER, DIALOGUE and SCENE WORKSHOP. The ideas presented in this series are of course not my own, but rather my own collection of lessons that particularly resonated with me, which I’ve tried to organise in a way that feels practical. However I should give special mention to the following inspirational teachers and sources which have contributed tremendous amounts of material to what’s included in this series. Robert McKee - https://mckeestory.com Blake Snyder - https://savethecat.com John August - https://johnaugust.com Craig Mazin - https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Craig_Mazin Syd Field - https://sydfield.com John Yorke - https://www.johnyorkestory.com Bang2Write - https://bang2write.com — ScreenStories is a place for storytellers to learn, to teach, to help each other out, and to be inspired. All discussion on screenwriting, storytelling, narrative, books, films, TV shows…or anything else that interests you is welcome. Most of the content here is in the form of writing tutorials, but art-is-more-art-than-science, and rules are meant to be broken, so please tell me if you disagree with anything in the videos, or would like to offer alternative perspectives on any of the topics. Thank you for being here! — Let’s keep the conversation going! Facebook - @ScreenStoriesChannel Instagram - @ScreenStoriesChannel Twitter - @_ScreenStories Web - screenstories.co LinkedIn - ScreenStories YouTube - ScreenStories
6 STEPS TO WRITING A SCREENPLAY | 4. CHARACTER
12:33

6 STEPS TO WRITING A SCREENPLAY | 4. CHARACTER

All stories are character driven. A plot exists almost entirely as a mechanism to reveal true character in your protagonist. In this episode we explore how you as a writer can create interesting characters, build out a cast design, and get your audience to empathise with your protagonist. — In this film we use examples from: Killing Eve - https://www.imdb.com/title/tt7016936/?ref_=nv_sr_srsg_0 Sherlock - https://www.imdb.com/title/tt1475582/?ref_=fn_al_tt_1 Avengers: Infinity War - https://www.imdb.com/title/tt4154756/?ref_=nv_sr_srsg_0 Indiana Jones and the Raiders of the Lost Ark - https://www.imdb.com/title/tt0082971/?ref_=nv_sr_srsg_0 Inglorious Basterds - https://www.imdb.com/title/tt0361748/?ref_=nv_sr_srsg_1 Macbeth - https://www.imdb.com/title/tt2884018/?ref_=nv_sr_srsg_4 No Country for Old Men - https://www.imdb.com/title/tt0477348/?ref_=nv_sr_srsg_0 Up - https://www.imdb.com/title/tt1049413/?ref_=nv_sr_srsg_4 — 6 STEPS TO WRITING A SCREENPLAY is a quick-start guide to transforming your initial ideas into a fully developed story. Across the series we look at IDEAS, PLOT, RHYTHM, CHARACTER, DIALOGUE and SCENE WORKSHOP. The ideas presented in this series are of course not my own, but rather my own collection of lessons that particularly resonated with me, which I’ve tried to organise in a way that feels practical. However I should give special mention to the following inspirational teachers and sources which have contributed tremendous amounts of material to what’s included in this series. Robert McKee - https://mckeestory.com Blake Snyder - https://savethecat.com John August - https://johnaugust.com Craig Mazin - https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Craig_Mazin Syd Field - https://sydfield.com John Yorke - https://www.johnyorkestory.com Bang2Write - https://bang2write.com — ScreenStories is a place for storytellers to learn, to teach, to help each other out, and to be inspired. All discussion on screenwriting, storytelling, narrative, books, films, TV shows…or anything else that interests you is welcome. Most of the content here is in the form of writing tutorials, but art-is-more-art-than-science, and rules are meant to be broken, so please tell me if you disagree with anything in the videos, or would like to offer alternative perspectives on any of the topics. Thank you for being here! — Let’s keep the conversation going! Facebook - @ScreenStoriesChannel Instagram - @ScreenStoriesChannel Twitter - @_ScreenStories Web - screenstories.co LinkedIn - ScreenStories YouTube - ScreenStories
6 STEPS TO WRITING A SCREENPLAY | 3. RHYTHM
08:20

6 STEPS TO WRITING A SCREENPLAY | 3. RHYTHM

Understanding the rhythm of your narrative both in terms of pacing and emotion helps you ensure your scenes are working in harmony. Make your film more powerful than the sum of its parts. Here we explore the emotional journey you’re designing, and use tempo to keep your audience on the edge of their seat. — In this film we use examples from: Rocky - https://www.imdb.com/title/tt0075148/?ref_=fn_al_tt_1 The Wolf of Wall Street - https://www.imdb.com/title/tt0993846/?ref_=fn_al_tt_4 The Pursuit of Happiness - https://www.imdb.com/title/tt0454921/?ref_=fn_al_tt_3 — 6 STEPS TO WRITING A SCREENPLAY is a quick-start guide to transforming your initial ideas into a fully developed story. Across the series we look at IDEAS, PLOT, RHYTHM, CHARACTER, DIALOGUE and SCENE WORKSHOP. The ideas presented in this series are of course not my own, but rather my own collection of lessons that particularly resonated with me, which I’ve tried to organise in a way that feels practical. However I should give special mention to the following inspirational teachers and sources which have contributed tremendous amounts of material to what’s included in this series. Robert McKee - https://mckeestory.com Blake Snyder - https://savethecat.com John August - https://johnaugust.com Craig Mazin - https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Craig_Mazin Syd Field - https://sydfield.com John Yorke - https://www.johnyorkestory.com Bang2Write - https://bang2write.com — ScreenStories is a place for storytellers to learn, to teach, to help each other out, and to be inspired. All discussion on screenwriting, storytelling, narrative, books, films, TV shows…or anything else that interests you is welcome. Most of the content here is in the form of writing tutorials, but art-is-more-art-than-science, and rules are meant to be broken, so please tell me if you disagree with anything in the videos, or would like to offer alternative perspectives on any of the topics. Thank you for being here! — Let’s keep the conversation going! Facebook - @ScreenStoriesChannel Instagram - @ScreenStoriesChannel Twitter - @_ScreenStories Web - screenstories.co LinkedIn - ScreenStories YouTube - ScreenStories
6 STEPS TO WRITING A SCREENPLAY | 5. DIALOGUE
16:35

6 STEPS TO WRITING A SCREENPLAY | 5. DIALOGUE

Dialogue is your tool as a writer to build great characters. It’s also one of the main ways you can really engage people right from page one in your script. In this episode we’ll look at approaching dialogue from your characters perspective, staying true to their goals, using subtext, emulating real speech, and keeping your audience hooked. — In this film we use examples from: True Grit - https://www.imdb.com/title/tt1403865/?ref_=nv_sr_srsg_0 The Hateful Eight - https://www.imdb.com/title/tt3460252/?ref_=nv_sr_srsg_0 Better Call Saul - https://www.imdb.com/title/tt3032476/?ref_=nv_sr_srsg_0 Breaking Bad - https://www.imdb.com/title/tt0903747/?ref_=nv_sr_srsg_0 Knocked Up - https://www.imdb.com/title/tt0478311/?ref_=nv_sr_srsg_0 Marriage Story - https://www.imdb.com/title/tt7653254/?ref_=nv_sr_srsg_0 No Country for Old Men - https://www.imdb.com/title/tt0477348/?ref_=nv_sr_srsg_0 Booksmart - https://www.imdb.com/title/tt1489887/?ref_=nv_sr_srsg_0 Pulp Fiction - https://www.imdb.com/title/tt0110912/?ref_=nv_sr_srsg_0 Killing Eve - https://www.imdb.com/title/tt7016936/?ref_=nv_sr_srsg_0 Knives Out - https://www.imdb.com/title/tt8946378/?ref_=fn_al_tt_1 Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Missouri - https://www.imdb.com/title/tt5027774/?ref_=fn_al_tt_1 — 6 STEPS TO WRITING A SCREENPLAY is a quick-start guide to transforming your initial ideas into a fully developed story. Across the series we look at IDEAS, PLOT, RHYTHM, CHARACTER, DIALOGUE and SCENE WORKSHOP. The ideas presented in this series are of course not my own, but rather my own collection of lessons that particularly resonated with me, which I’ve tried to organise in a way that feels practical. However I should give special mention to the following inspirational teachers and sources which have contributed tremendous amounts of material to what’s included in this series. Robert McKee - https://mckeestory.com Blake Snyder - https://savethecat.com John August - https://johnaugust.com Craig Mazin - https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Craig_Mazin Syd Field - https://sydfield.com John Yorke - https://www.johnyorkestory.com Bang2Write - https://bang2write.com — ScreenStories is a place for storytellers to learn, to teach, to help each other out, and to be inspired. All discussion on screenwriting, storytelling, narrative, books, films, TV shows…or anything else that interests you is welcome. Most of the content here is in the form of writing tutorials, but art-is-more-art-than-science, and rules are meant to be broken, so please tell me if you disagree with anything in the videos, or would like to offer alternative perspectives on any of the topics. Thank you for being here! — Let’s keep the conversation going! Facebook - @ScreenStoriesChannel Instagram - @ScreenStoriesChannel Twitter - @_ScreenStories Web - screenstories.co LinkedIn - ScreenStories YouTube - ScreenStories
6 STEPS TO WRITING A SCREENPLAY | 6. SCENE WORKSHOP
07:25

6 STEPS TO WRITING A SCREENPLAY | 6. SCENE WORKSHOP

If you’ve made it this far from the start then congratulations, you’re at the last step! I love that phrase “get it written, then get it right”. Well this step is all about that second part. Now it’s time to stress-test your scenes, and make them work as hard as possible to maximise emotion. This episode is full of handy tips and workflows to find and fix problem scenes, and find interesting ways to deliver the unexpected for your audience. — In this film we use examples from: The Sixth Sense - https://www.imdb.com/title/tt0167404/?ref_=nv_sr_srsg_0 Planet of the Apes - https://www.imdb.com/title/tt0063442/?ref_=nv_sr_srsg_7 Star Wars: Episode V - The Empire Strikes Back - https://www.imdb.com/title/tt0080684/?ref_=nv_sr_srsg_0 Barton Fink - https://www.imdb.com/title/tt0101410/?ref_=nv_sr_srsg_4 Star Wars: Episode II - Attack of the Clones - https://www.imdb.com/title/tt0121765/?ref_=nv_sr_srsg_3 The Room - https://www.imdb.com/title/tt0368226/?ref_=nv_sr_srsg_0 — 6 STEPS TO WRITING A SCREENPLAY is a quick-start guide to transforming your initial ideas into a fully developed story. Across the series we look at IDEAS, PLOT, RHYTHM, CHARACTER, DIALOGUE and SCENE WORKSHOP. The ideas presented in this series are of course not my own, but rather my own collection of lessons that particularly resonated with me, which I’ve tried to organise in a way that feels practical. However I should give special mention to the following inspirational teachers and sources which have contributed tremendous amounts of material to what’s included in this series. Robert McKee - https://mckeestory.com Blake Snyder - https://savethecat.com John August - https://johnaugust.com Craig Mazin - https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Craig_Mazin Syd Field - https://sydfield.com John Yorke - https://www.johnyorkestory.com Bang2Write - https://bang2write.com — ScreenStories is a place for storytellers to learn, to teach, to help each other out, and to be inspired. All discussion on screenwriting, storytelling, narrative, books, films, TV shows…or anything else that interests you is welcome. Most of the content here is in the form of writing tutorials, but art-is-more-art-than-science, and rules are meant to be broken, so please tell me if you disagree with anything in the videos, or would like to offer alternative perspectives on any of the topics. Thank you for being here! — Let’s keep the conversation going! Facebook - @ScreenStoriesChannel Instagram - @ScreenStoriesChannel Twitter - @_ScreenStories Web - screenstories.co LinkedIn - ScreenStories YouTube - ScreenStories

CHANNEL

Powerful, emotive storytelling is at the heart of what we do, so we run a YouTube channel dedicated to the principles and elements of narrative.

Humans are hard-wired to receive life-lessons and understand the world around them through story, so we're committed to using these techniques to help make the world a better place.

Check out some of our content below.